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Mansion

Mansion

by PETYA ALEXANDROVA

) In linguistic and ethimology dictionaries:

mansion (n.)

mid-14c., "chief residence of a lord," from Old French mansion "stay, permanent abode, house, habitation, home; mansion; state, situation" (13c.), from Latin mansionem (nominative mansio) "a staying, a remaining, night quarters, station," noun of action from past participle stem of manere "to stay, abide" (from PIE root *men- (3) "to remain").

Sense of "any large and stately house" is from 1510s. The word also was used in Middle English as "a stop or stage of a journey," hence probably astrological sense "temporary home" (late 14c.).

mansion (plural mansions)

  1. A large houseor building, usually built for the wealthy.
  2. (Britain) A luxurious flat(apartment).
  3. (obsolete) A house provided for a clergyman; a manse.
  4. (obsolete) A stopping-place during a journey; a stage. quotations ▲

According to that Cabaliſticall Dogma: If Abram had not had this Letter [i.e., ה‎ (he)] added unto his Name he had remained fruitleſſe, and without the power of generation: […] So that being ſterill before, he received the power of generation from that meaſure and manſion in the Archetype; and was made conformable unto Binah.

  1. (historical) An astrological house; a station of the moon. quotations ▲
    • Late 14th century: Which book spak muchel of the operaciouns / Touchynge the eighte and twenty mansiouns/ That longen to the moone — Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Franklin's Tale’, Canterbury Tales
  2. (Chineseastronomy) One of twenty-eight sections of the sky.
  3. (chiefly in the plural) An individual habitation or apartmentwithin a large house or group of buildings. (Now chiefly in allusion to John 14:2.) quotations ▲
    • 1611Bible, Authorized (King James) Version, John XIV.2:

In my Father's house are many mansions [transl. μοναὶ (monaì)]: if it were not so, I would have told you.

  • Denham

These poets near our princes sleep, / And in one grave their mansions keep.

  • 2003The Economist, (subtitle), 18 Dec 2003:

The many mansions in one east London house of God.

  1. Any of the branches of the Rastafari
  2. Literary Examples of "mansion"
  • Down stairs they discussed in curious tones—not her, but the mistress of the mansion .

Ester Ried Yet Speaking

Isabella Alden

  • It was like a meeting in a side corridor of a mansion full of 

The Secret Agent

Joseph Conrad

  • And then there was our dispute at Albany--in the Patroon's mansion , you will recall.

In the Valley

Harold Frederic

  • As they did not belong to the mansion , they were expelled by the two little boys.

Life And Adventures Of Martin Chuzzlewit

Charles Dickens

  1. The article in Britannica

Mansion, also called House, scenic device used in medieval theatrical staging. Individual mansions represented different locales in biblical stories and in scenes from the life of Christ as performed in churches. A mansion consisted of a small booth containing a stage with corner posts supporting ...

Christchurch Mansion, in Ipswich, Suffolk, Eng., Tudor mansion built between 1548 and 1550 by Edmund Withipoll and now maintained as an art gallery and museum that is part of the Ipswich Museum of Art. The mansion houses a collection of local antiquities, including paintings and memorials ...

The Mansion, novel by William Faulkner, first published in 1959 as the third volume of his Snopes trilogy. The rapacious Snopes family meets its final dissolution in The Mansion. In the two previous volumes, The Hamlet (1940) and The Town (1957), Faulkner had described the ascent of ruthless Flem ...

Mansion House, official residence of the lord mayor of the City of London. It stands in the City’s central financial district, across from the Bank of England and the Royal Exchange. Notable sections of the house include the dining room known as the Egyptian Hall, the second-story Ball Room ...

White House, formerly Executive Mansion (1810–1902), the official office and residence of the president of the United States at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue N.W. in Washington, D.C. The White House and its landscaped grounds occupy 18 acres (7.2 hectares). Since the administration of George Washington ...